0 to 7 minutes

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    “Location, location, location. Which other hotel offers you the luxury of discovering the symbols of Ancient Rome within a 0 to 7-minute radius?

    From the Capitoline Hill to the Roman Forum, from the temples of the Pantheon to the first Christian churches, to the basilica housing one of Michelangelo’s masterpieces? And may we suggest a viewpoint from which to find your bearings amid such beauty?

    From the magnificent terrace of our Aroma Restaurant, discover 1500 years of history before your very eyes."

    Bruno Papaleo
    Manager, Palazzo Manfredi

  • 0 to 7 minutes - photo 1

0 to 7 minutes

“Location, location, location. Which other hotel offers you the luxury of discovering the symbols of Ancient Rome within a 0 to 7-minute radius?

From the Capitoline Hill to the Roman Forum, from the temples of the Pantheon to the first Christian churches, to the basilica housing one of Michelangelo’s masterpieces? And may we suggest a viewpoint from which to find your bearings amid such beauty?

From the magnificent terrace of our Aroma Restaurant, discover 1500 years of history before your very eyes."

Bruno Papaleo
Manager, Palazzo Manfredi

0 minutes away - Ludus Magnus

We are right above it. It is part of our very foundations. The Great Game, as the literal translation of Ludus Magnus goes, was the largest and most important of Rome’s gladiatorial schools, and was located beside the Colosseum, connected to the latter by an underground passage.

Commissioned by Diocletian and situated in the valley between the Esquiline and Caelian hills, the building had the typical layout of a barracks with dormitories and amenities on three floors. At the centre lay an arena, a smaller-scale reproduction of that of the Colosseum.

The ruins of the barracks were discovered in 1937, though much of the structure remains hidden. Did you know that only one-tenth or less of the the ruins of Ancient Rome have been uncovered to date?

1 minute away - Colosseum

Sixty seconds to the Colosseum. Just step out of our hotel, take a few steps, and you’re there, before the largest amphitheatre in the world, the symbol par excellence of Ancient Rome and Italy. Construction was begun by Vespasian in 72 AD and was completed eight years later under the Emperor Titus. The Colosseum's magnificent arena, seating up to 80,000 spectators, was dedicated to gladiatorial games and, because the stage could be “flooded”, was also used re-enact the greatest naval battles. 

The Colosseum was abandoned after the 6th century, becoming a quarry. Interestingly, the name “Colosseum” originates from the nearby Colossus Neronis, becoming widespread only in the Middle Ages. You can continue admiring this architectural masterpiece as you dine on the terrace of our superb Aroma Restaurant.

2 minutes away - Oppian hill park and the Domus Aurea

A magnificent haven of greenery and shade, home to some of Rome’s most extraordinary treasures. Such is the seductive beauty of Oppian Hill Park unfolding before our hotel. The starting point is the Domus Aurea, Nero's city villa built after the terrible fire that devastated Rome in 64 AD. The “Golden House”, designed by architects Celer and Severus, had 300 rooms, swimming pools and fountains. Of particular interest are the grotesques. 

Over time, the Domus Aurea were completely buried and the Baths of Trajan were built over much of it. The Domus Aurea was forgotten until, in the 15th century, a boy fell through a hole on the slopes of Oppian Hill and found himself in a strange frescoed cave. 

It was a revelation. In no time, artists from Ghirlandaio to Pinturicchio, from Raphael to Michelangelo, had themselves lowered into the cave to view this marvel with their own eyes. The grotesques’ beauty had a profound influence on Renaissance artists. Proof? Visit the Raphael’s loggia at the Vatican and you’ll see that, in this city, history never ends. Needless to say that Oppian Hill Park is a magnificent place for a walk or an early morning jog.

3 minutes away - Basilica of Saint Clement

Rome's history and the extraordinary passage from the classical to the Christian eras are a stone’s throw from your room. Enter the spectacular Basilica of Saint Clement and discover its incredible structure spanning three floors. A tip: Start on the lowest level, some 10 metres (30 feet) underground, where you will find two dwellings, one from the 1st century AD, the other from the 2nd century. The courtyard of the latter was turned into a Mithraeum, a temple for worshipping the pagan god Mithras. 

Next, climb to the 4th-century basilica on the second level built by the emperor Constantine. Preserved here are the relics of St Cyril, apostle to the Slavs, and some picturesque frescoes depicting the miracle of St Clement, third successor to St Peter. 

Ascend one more level and, like Dante, you will “see the stars again” among the stunning mosaics and frescoes of the 12th-century basilica. Lose yourself in the exquisite apse and, whatever you do, don’t miss the cycle of frescoes dedicated to St Catherine painted by Masolino da Panicale at the turn of the 15th century.

4 minutes away - The Imperial Fora

The road to the Imperial Fora begins and ends before us. Fancy a stroll through Imperial Rome? Want to walk through the world’s most spectacular string of squares? If so, start at the Forum of Caesar, inaugurated in 46 BC. Did you know that Julius Caesar claimed to be descended from Venus and that he personally bought the land on which the temple dedicated to the god was to be built? A short walk away is the Forum of Augustus, inaugurated in 2 BC, with porticoes and exedras where the courts sat. 

Sixty years later, the Temple of Peace was built by Vespasian. Then, in 98 AD, the Emperor Domitian connected all of these complexes by building a square linking the Temple of Peace to the Forums of Caesar and Augustus. The last imperial forum to be built was Trajan’s, inaugurated in 113 BC and financed with the spoils from the conquest of Dacia.

5 minutes away - Roman Forum

This was the commercial, religious and political heart of Rome, and lay in the valley between the Palatine and Capitoline hills. The Roman historian Livy wrote that shortly after the founding of Rome, in 753 BC, a violent battle was fought between the Romans and the Sabines in the area where the future forum would stand. During the battle, Romulus, seeing his soldiers retreat, invoked Jupiter, promising to build a temple dedicated to him if the Romans were victorious. The attack recommenced. At that very moment, the Sabine women, who had been kidnapped by the Romans, threw themselves between the two armies begging for peace. 

The finishing touches to the Roman Forum were made in the imperial era, begun by Caesar and completed by Augustus, with the construction of new temples and magnificent squares. Later, in the 4th century, the monumental Basilica of Maxentius was built under Emperor Maxentius, and was designed as place where legal matters could be transacted. 

At the fall of the Roman Empire and during the Middle Ages, the Forum gradually became buried and was used as a pasture, from which it took the name “Campo Vaccino” or “Cow Pasture”. The fatal blow, however, was inflicted by Pope Julius II, who sat from 1503 to 1513, and who decided to use the area as a quarry for reusable materials, often turning them into lime. The protests of Michelangelo and Raphael fell on deaf ears.

6 minutes away - Capitoline Hill and the Capitoline Museums

Rome was born here, on Capitoline Hill. According to legend, the god Saturn created the first settlement here, in which the Greeks, led by Hercules, were welcomed. The hill probably takes its name from the head, “caput” in Latin, of a warrior named Tolo or Olo, which was unearthed during excavations for the foundations of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, which was dedicated to Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. During the imperial era, Augustus built a small temple dedicated to Mars on the Capitolium, to which were later added other temples commissioned by Titus, Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius. By that time, the Capitoline Hill had become a place of worship and the destination for processions and victory parades.
 
During the Renaissance, Pope Paul III commissioned Michelangelo to design the Capitoline Square. In 1539, the great architect, sculptor and painter placed at the square’s centre the Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius, sculpted in 176 BC (today, a copy stands in its place, with the original kept in the Capitoline Museums). He also designed new access steps, the Cordonata, allowing the hill to be ascended on horseback. 

Today, the Capitoline Square is flanked by the splendid Capitoline Museums. May we suggest at least four statues that are true masterpieces? The Capitoline Wolf, symbol of the city and Mater Romanorum, the Capitoline Venus, the Dying Galatian and Cupid and Psyche. Love Caravaggio? Then don’t miss “St John the Baptist”, painted by the artist in 1603. 

Walk down the Capitoline Hill to the Roman Forum.

7 minutes away - Saint Peter in Chains and Michelangelo's Moses

A masterpiece by Michelangelo? Before visiting the Sistine Chapel, visit this splendid basilica, one of Rome’s oldest, and the final resting place of Pope Julius II, the great patron of Michelangelo, from whom he also commissioned his monumental tomb. The statue of Moses is part of this ensemble. 

In 442, Licinia Eudoxia, the wife of Emperor Valentinian III, ordered a church to be built near the Baths of Titus in which to house the chains of St Peter, (“vincula” in Latin), which the Empress’s mother, Elia Eudoxia, had received as a gift from Juvenal, the patriarch of Jerusalem, during her travels in the Holy Land.

The Basilica has been restored on several occasions and its current form dates back to work carried out under Pope Julius II in 1503. Ten years later his remains were buried here.

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